Security

Midterm elections, social media and hacking: What you need to know

By on September 5, 2019
Close-up of a computerized screen displaying a ballot, and a hand reaching to press a red touch-screen button that says,

When it comes to the 2018 midterm elections in the US, bad actors are still trying to mess with your vote.

Russian hackers and propagandists who interfered in the 2016 US presidential election didn’t stop when it was over. They’re still trying to influence the vote, and now they’re being joined by other countries hoping to influence the midterms, according to the US Department of Homeland Security and other agencies. On Oct. 19, the US Department of Justice indicted a Russian woman for her alleged role in continued election interference, from the time leading up to the 2016 elections through to 2018.

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Security

New Intel chip flaw leaves your PC exposed again

By on August 31, 2019
Full Frame Shot Of Computer Chip

Intel chips have another flaw that could let skilled hackers pull sensitive information from microprocessors, Intel and independent security researchers said Tuesday.

The researchers say a flaw in the microprocessors is vulnerable to four new attacks, each of which could capture information like encryption keys and passwords — the building blocks of security for the rest of your computer. The research was reported earlier by Wired, which said the flaw affects millions of PCs.

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Security

Apple responds to Congress’ letter on data security and privacy

By on July 13, 2019
Two iPhones side by side. One red, one blue, on a sheep-skin rug.

Apple has just responded to Congress’ inquiry on how it protects user privacy.

The House Committee on Energy and Commerce last month sent letters to Apple CEO Tim Cook and Alphabet CEO Larry Page asking about the companies’ data security and privacy practices. The five-page letter to Cook asked detailed questions about how Apple collected user data and what it used it for.

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Security

TSA outlines plans to expand facial recognition use on domestic flights

By on June 21, 2019
Holiday Travel Ahead Of Thanksgiving Clogs Airports And Highways

The Transportation Security Administration on Monday laid out its roadmap for the use of facial recognition on US domestic flights.

It focuses on partnering with US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) on biometrics for international travelers, expanding them to passengers using TSA Precheck, ultimately using facial recognition on more domestic travelers and improving the infrastructure supporting all this.

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